— Shared 8 hours ago - 2,959 notes - via / Source - reblog

Oh, we’ve got a wedding to go to, anyway.
Wedding?
Ours, dumb-dumb.



— Shared 11 hours ago - 60 notes - via / Source - reblog
punkgods:

eponine x cosette

Am I more than you bargained for yet?

The Bureau had always told Agent Fauchelevent to never let her heart interfere with her head. And that had always been relatively easy— until she was assigned the case of Eponine Thenardier, wanted in three continents on countless charges of burglary, grand theft, and at least one possible murder. It doesn’t take Cosette to realize that she’s in way over her head, but, for once in her life, she’s not sure if that’s a bad thing.  

punkgods:

eponine x cosette

Am I more than you bargained for yet?

The Bureau had always told Agent Fauchelevent to never let her heart interfere with her head. And that had always been relatively easy— until she was assigned the case of Eponine Thenardier, wanted in three continents on countless charges of burglary, grand theft, and at least one possible murder. It doesn’t take Cosette to realize that she’s in way over her head, but, for once in her life, she’s not sure if that’s a bad thing.  


— Shared 12 hours ago - 300,617 notes - via / Source - reblog

perfectly-imperfect-carlos:

donutsornonuts:

We are gathered here today because SOMEBODY *glares at coffin* couldn’t stay alive.

Cecil when he is forced to attend another intern’s funeral


— Shared 12 hours ago - 16,954 notes - via / Source - reblog
jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place


— Shared 12 hours ago - 124,925 notes - via / Source - reblog

roflandtroll:

littlewhitely:

*salivates profusely* 

*Very, very heavy breathing* 


— Shared 12 hours ago - 81,545 notes - via / Source - reblog

thescienceofjohnlock:

zitoisneato:

batter-sempai:

transientday:

lohkir:

fencehopping:

Casting a fire ant colony with molten aluminum

Not saying that killing ants just because it’s cool. But hey.

I’ve seen this post and the original video before.

That ant colony belongs to an invasive species of fire ant (called Red Imported Fire Ants or RIFAs) which cause more harm to the local environment than good. Researchers are experimenting with extremely high temperatures as a means to dispose of invasive insect species and, just so you know, molten aluminum is VERY HOT.

Not saying this is the best way to do it, but these folks are doing a service for the local environment and they got a beautiful piece of art for their efforts.

It’s also good for Science because we get to see what the inside of a fire ant nest look like. That’s really cool.

Thats pretty metal.

It’s literally pretty metal. 


— Shared 15 hours ago - 27,763 notes - via / Source - reblog

allons-brie:

AU where we’re all well rested and everyone loves their job


— Shared 15 hours ago - 73,775 notes - via / Source - reblog

theoldkingsofwinter:

courtnog:

okay so if harry potter was born in 1980, and went to hogwarts in like 91, that means he was in his sixth year in 1996
do you think he knew about the spice girls? i mean.. i know he had shit going on with horcruxes that year but wannabe isn’t something that happens without you taking note of it

 (via meggannn)


— Shared 15 hours ago - 14,084 notes - via / Source - reblog

The mistake people make when they talk about not being able to trust Wikipedia is in the implicit assumption that we could trust encyclopedias as infallible sources before Wikipedia.

I like Wikipedia because I know it could be wrong. Regular encyclopedias can be wrong, too, but my guard was never up in the same way with them as it is with Wikipedia. I like Internet media specifically for the reason that Aaron Sorkin doesn’t like it: because it makes it that much more difficult for me to have any illusions about the fact that the burden of critical thought is on me.

I don’t automatically trust bloggers because a group of people I’ve never met decided to give them a badge that says “reporter” on it. I don’t turn off my critical thinking because they’ve gotten to be some sort of “professional”. I have to judge them on the merits of their writing and history of thoughtfulness or thoughtlessness alone. That is a feature, not a bug, because we should never trust any news media outlet implicitly.

On the Internet Everyone Knows You Could Be a Dog, or Why I Think Aaron Sorkin Is Wrong About the Value of Established Media Outlets (via researchtobedone)

I also love Wikipedia because they usually come with a bibliography I can go to for additional information or to fact check..

(via bjornwilde)


— Shared 15 hours ago - 4,351 notes - via / Source - reblog

mangascene:

Just my imagination running wild. I hope this is ok.


— Shared 15 hours ago - 171 notes - via / Source - reblog

threeofeight:

Warehouse 13: The Next Generation

Read More


— Shared 15 hours ago - 25 notes - via / Source - reblog

sophiealdred:

Stop what you’re doing, it’s time for your regular schedule’d viewing of Sylvester McCoy bouncing spoons of Sophie Aldred’s bum